My Story

There is

Thank you for visiting my blog! My name is Jenny. I’m a mom with a wonderful husband and two beautiful daughters, both in their 20s.

I’ve had panic attacks since I was ten years old. At that time, I had no idea what was wrong with me. I never told my parents because I didn’t know how to describe my scary and weird sensations. I thought there was something really wrong with me that could never be fixed.

Stigma prevented me from talking about my problem. I finally reached out for medical help when I was in my early 30s. My diagnosis: panic disorder with agoraphobia.

My youngest daughter Talee showed signs of panic attacks when she was nine years old. I knew right away what was wrong, but didn’t want to admit it. The last thing I wanted was for my sweet little girl to have to deal with the terrifying symptoms like I did.

We’ve made it through — Talee and I have recovered. Anxiety no longer rules us. We are the ones in control.

I used to feel so alone. Now I know there are millions of people dealing with anxiety and other mental health conditions.

My hope is that this blog will inspire and motivate others affected by mental illness. One of the most important steps on the journey to recovery is to know that you are not alone.

Please feel free to comment, I’d love to hear from you!

Peace from Panic

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232 thoughts on “My Story

  1. Pingback: Liebster Award: Thank You!! | raw honesty

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  3. This is really an inspiring blog and your intentions are very awe-inspiring and admirable I must say. I can imagine the horror you would have undergone, when you came to know your li’l one also has panic attacks like you. But atleast she has a mom who understood this and supported her in all the ways she could. Kudos to you and your wonderful family ❤ Glad to have stumbled upon your blog. Cheers and warmest wishes, Minaxi.

    Welcoming you to visit my corner of the blogosphere as well 🙂 I have a very positive outlook on life and firmly believe in Live Every Moment. Laugh Every Day. Love Without Limits. Hope you like my little space in the wide world of blogs.

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  5. I will indicate I would like to follow your blog. I was notified you are following mine at this point in time. If I can be encouraging or inspiring in any way I will try to be. Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you. I think it’s important to speak out about mental health issues. Millions are affected, and yet, there is still so much stigma associated with mental illness. Thank you so much for visiting my blog! Hope you’re having a wonderful day! Jenny

      Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Suzanne, I’m sorry to hear your daughter is having anxiety issues. Panic attacks are very scary and you feel so alone (I did). But there are millions of others with anxiety disorder. For me, a huge part of starting to recover was knowing I wasn’t alone. And also realizing there is treatment available. I thought no one would ever figure out my problem or be able to help. Thankfully, I was wrong about that! Thank you for the kind words! Jenny

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Thank you for sharing your story, the bravery it takes and the impact it makes are tremendous. I wake with anxiety in the middle of the night and the only cure I have found, is tucking under my Husbands arm while he sleeps. I thank God for his calm heartbeat.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. I find myself wondering how you got your panic attacks under control – that’d make for a wonderfully helpful (for those who have the same) and interesting (for those who don’t) post. 🙂
    You have my very best wishes, Jenny.
    Robert (from York in the UK).

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Pingback: Welcome Dream Big Partner: Peace from Panic! | Dream Big, Dream Often

  9. Jenny, this is a topic that more of us should be talking about. Thanks for sharing your testimony. I work with children and I’m blessed to work with a counselor who has taught me a great deal about how to address students’ emotional needs.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Michelle! I appreciate your kind comment. Yes, mental health issues need to be talked about, to help end the stigma. That’s wonderful about your work with children, and that you’re in tune to what they need emotionally. Take care, Jenny

      Liked by 1 person

  10. When my son was only a toddler, I knew that something was wrong in terms of his anxiety and mental health. He suffered from separation anxiety and, in my attempts to seek out help for him, I was often told I was babying him and that he just needed to ‘man up’ as he got older. I have been surrounded by mental health issues my entire life so I understand and applaud your sharing of your experiences with anxiety.

    I am happy to say that my son, now 26, has a tremendous understanding of his mental health issues and takes very good care of himself. I refused to give up and I pushed and pushed for help especially after he had his first major depressive episode when he was 10. This is what we moms do; we protect our young and prepare them for the great big ole world ahead of them. We just happened to have to prepare them with extra coping skills and understanding of theirs (and ours) mental health issues.

    I can’t wait to get to know you and follow your posts. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda, what a wonderful mother you are to know your son needed help, and you never gave up on getting him that help. It’s so nice to meet you and ‘talk’ to you, as I can tell you can relate and completely understand where I’m coming from. I appreciate that very much! My daughter had severe separation anxiety as well, and she always told me she was scared, but didn’t know why. It was heartbreaking. I’m glad your son is doing well now, that must make you so proud. My daughter is super confident and even out-going now (she’s 21), and I never would’ve believed that when she was five. Thank you for your kind words and for sharing your story. So glad we connected! Take care, Jenny 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Very inspiring Jenny. I have anxiety issues too…in fact most don’t know in my real world because I moderate, or repress it with avoidance strategies…recently I’ve had help with that and changing how I think via mindfulness…hence the challenge participation where you found my blog.

    Great to meet you and I’m looking forward to your posts too 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Gary! I understand about repressing anxiety so people don’t know. I did that for years. I’m glad you’ve gotten help and practice mindfulness. I’ve found that being mindful helps keep me calm and in the present. Thanks for visiting my blog! Have a wonderful week ahead!

      Liked by 1 person

      • I think many people do exactly that…it didn’t help me much just mad it worse. I did a mindfulness course online and it helped massively to address thinking and point out a lot if it was done from a default mind that was jogging along all by itself on autopilot. I refer to that a lot in the kindness challenge I was doing. I hope your week goes very well too 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      • That’s part of it I think. Self realisation. It’s a journey I should have started ages ago! Still, it’s begun now and that’s what counts yes 😊

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Hi Jenny, Thank you for reading and following my blog and likewise I have followed and reading yours. I have a form of anxiety and I did not realise it until I started to calm myself down and look deeper into myself I found the nervous tension was irritating me. Though I would say people who suffer from anxiety are very sensitive to their environment. I like fresh air and closed environments especially working places where there are no windows or air I find very hard to tolerate. The things you listed which give you a sense of calm are all places sensitive people prefer to be also as they get relief from those types of areas. I work with energy and differing energy can make feel anxious too that is too much negative energy the need to get away from the area or people. I am pleased to have connected to you looking forward to reading more and the journey.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Moving around as much as I have, I learned Anxiety Disorders are a thing all over the country. You are so right to drive the point home, you are not alone. Often knowing one is not simply a “freak” and people actually care makes all the difference.<3 ❤ ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  14. It’s nice to meet you, Jenny 🙂
    It takes such courage to share your anxiety and agoraphobia. I have clinical depression since childhood, and anxiety since my teens.
    Wishing you all the best
    Faith and Oscar Dandelion 🐻 💟 🐕

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Hi! First, I’d like to say thank you for the follow, if I haven’t yet (sometimes I lose track)…Your story is prompting me to research on panic disorder, to check if I have it or what (not that I am suspecting it, but better have an idea now than be sorry). Good to know yours is under control 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  16. I’m glad to have found your blog through OM’s re-blog. I kept hesitating to delete the email about a grandfather’s wisdom. I have so many emails! But instead, I clicked on it, which brought me to your blog which grabbed my attention, because I have a daughter with panic, anxiety and depression. I sometimes wonder where she got that from but have to remember that my mother suffered greatly from anxiety and depression, even having electro-shock therapy back in 60s, which of course influenced me. Yeah, there’s some anxiety there alright. My girl has a liking for mindfulness techniques and is in therapy with meds. It’s always good to read about how others make it through challenges. Best wishes!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi JoAnna, I’m glad you didn’t delete the email, haha! But I totally get what you mean about too many emails! I’m really happy to connect with you. We have quite a bit in common. My mom had severe depression, and also had electro-shock therapy. I’m sorry to hear your mom suffered, and that your daughter is dealing with anxiety and depression. I definitely understand where you’re coming from! That’s good your daughter is finding help with meds and therapy. Mindfulness techniques are wonderful. And lots of deep breathing. Thanks so much for visiting here, and for the follow. I’m heading over to your blog now. Take care, Jenny

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  17. I have struggled with anxiety and OCD for so many years. Now that I have children I fear them inheriting my panic. I fear raising them to panic. Thankful to find your blog and know I’m not alone.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You are definitely not alone. I understand how it is as the parent to be struggling with anxiety, and unfortunately, also as the mom of a child who struggled with panic. The good news is that I could get my daughter help right away because I knew what was wrong. I wish you all the best! So happy to connect with you.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. I think it’s amazing how you helped your daughter. While it’s very rare that I will have an actual panic attack, I do deal with anxiety and stress, and my mom(or anyone) isn’t really there for me. Reading your blog has really helped, and I just wanted to say thank you for all the hard work you’ve put into your blog. You’re such an inspiration to me!
    ~Genna

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    • Hi Genna, I can’t tell you how much this means to me. I appreciate your kind words, and I’m so glad that what I’ve written has helped you. Thank you so much for letting me know. I hope you’re doing well. Take care! 🙂 Jenny

      Liked by 1 person

  19. I appreciate your story very much. Many years ago, I was suffering from panic attacks. I was lucky to find a therapist who treated panic and agoraphobia. He helped me so much. He had me read Claire Weekes’ book “Hope and Help for Your Nerves” and “When I Say No, I Feel Guilty” by Manuel Smith. The key thing I remember about this book is that the therapist told me people who suffer from panic don’t assert themselves. These books along with relaxation tapes and practical therapy got me back on airplanes and traveling again. Thank you for continuing to inform people there is hope for freedom from panic. Thanks for following my blog. Peace.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. We have a common mission to connect with others through words. Thank you for bravely sharing so that others know they are not alone in their experience.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Jenny your blog is great! One of my daughters has dealt with anxiety for a couple of years beginning at age 7. This bled into her eating and she would hardly eat for about a year (she thought that eating would make her stomach hurt.) We had to go to therapy to help her with coping mechanisms and self-calming skills. She’s much better now, but when she gets stressed about school, one might creep up again. Thank you for sharing your story and journey!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for sharing that about your daughter. That must have been so difficult/frustrating/heartbreaking to watch her go through that. I’m glad she learned skills from therapy and is better now! Thank you for your kind words. Take care! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Your story is very similar to my own. It’s hard living with a panic disorder. It’s so great to hear a supportive mother to a child that experienced panic attacks. Your child with benefit greatly with a mother who’s been there and can help along the way. Excited to follow your blog!

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Jenny, I’m glad I found your blog. Actually, I’m glad you found mine so that I could find yours.

    I have bipolar disorder, but anxiety is a very common co-existing condition with bipolar. I remember my first anxiety at age 14. It was terrible! I didn’t say anything at first, but then I finally did and a doctor put me on Buspar. I don’t remember it doing too much, but I got past the anxiety. But anxiety haunted me from time to time throughout my life. It was at it’s worst when I was in my late 30s. Having anxiety along with hypomania/mania or depression really sucks!

    I experienced a period of agoraphobia, too. It lasted maybe a year. To be honest, I still have some minor difficulties getting out of the house, but I give my therapist great credit for helping me progress out of the worst of it. I’ve had all kinds of anxiety symptoms. When I had agoraphobia I also had some specific phobias, but they too have eased a lot.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m glad we connected with each other! Thanks so much for sharing your experiences. I’m sorry about your anxiety, I know how awful it is. Sounds like you’re doing much better, which is awesome! Like you, I didn’t want to say anything about my symptoms. Glad you did and got help. Thanks again for visiting here and your comment. Take care, Jenny

      Liked by 1 person

  24. Hey Jenny! I saw your post on NAMI’s blog (I’m in the process of writing one for them also!) I’m a YA author, and my most recent release is a novel about the teenage experience of anxiety. Reading your story, it struck me that you might really enjoy my book. I would love to send you a copy if you’re interested, just to thank you for all your transparency and honesty on your blog. I know you’ve helped a lot of people! My novel is called All Things New (you can learn more about it here: https://www.amazon.com/All-Things-New-Lauren-Miller/dp/0998511110/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=) Either way, thanks for all you’ve done to raise awareness about anxiety and panic attacks!

    Liked by 1 person

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